Tag Archives: Martin Luther

Do you know your theological father?

Sermon given on Fathers Day 2018.  This is again loosely connected to the Church of Resurrection’s stained glass window (Leawod, KS) that has woven the sermons together since January 6, 2018.  There is one more planned before stepping away from the pulpit for a time of renewal. 

The calendar and all the media remind us that today is Father’s Day.  Certainly one might consider that this is an appropriate day to focus on the father figures that fill the scriptures, but in the Church of Resurrection’s stained glass window, the inclusion of five men connects The Church to Father’s Day by looking at how The Church continues to adapt especially through the fathers of the evolving church.

This Father’s Day, I ask whether or not you can identify the father-theologian figure of your own faith.  What we believe today is the final product of all the influences that shape and continue to shape your spiritual journey—just like your earthly father influenced your own life whether genetically, physically, mentally, emotionally, or even professionally.

As a Methodist, you might automatically assume that your theological father was simply John Wesley, but that really is not as simple as you may realize.  Why even John Wesley struggled to understand his own theological foundation—remember, he reported that he was afraid he did not have salvation until his Aldersgate experience.

Teaching students Greek and Latin roots, the definition of theology boils down to just two elements:  theo meaning God, and ology meaning study of.  Simply theology is the study of God; but that places theology at a distance from our daily world.  Theology in our real life experience is much broader and applies to each individual differently.  One’s personal theology is a philosophy or mindset, as explained on Bible.org, theology is “. . . a belief system that is built upon intellectually and emotionally held commitments concerning God and man.”  Even those definitions really do not fully develop what theology is.  The article concludes with this statement:

In short, theology is a set of intellectual and emotional commitments, justified or not, about God and man which dictate ones beliefs and actions.  Neither the word itself is irrelevant, nor the concepts which it seeks to articulate. It is the first pursuit of knowledge and wisdom.  [Accessed on June 12, 2018 at https://bible.org/article/what-theology%5D

 

Maybe you do not think it is important to know your theology.  I think it is.  In fact, the artist must have understood that Pope John XXIII (#10), Martin Luther (#26), John Wesley (#8), C.S. Lewis (#28) and Dietrich Bonhoeffer (#16) each contributed to the continued growth of The Church or they would not have added.

To begin identifying who is the father of your personal theology, one begins with the Old Testament, but even there, the list is tremendous as many characters could be identified as a theologian.  I argue that all those who are listed as prophets would be considered theologians, not to mention other leaders such as David.

David became a king, he was a political leader, but God chose him for his faithfulness.  The psalms he wrote reflect his theology, and two verses specifically connect God as a father figure:

Scripture:

            In Psalm 2, David is speaking on the occasion of his coronation as God’s chosen king of Israel.  He begins the psalm with an explanation of the battling nations and establishes his relationship with God, especially in verse 7.

Psalms 2:1-6

Why are the nations so angry?
Why do they waste their time with futile plans?
The kings of the earth prepare for battle;
the rulers plot together
against the Lord
and against his anointed one.
“Let us break their chains,” they cry,
“and free ourselves from slavery to God.”

But the one who rules in heaven laughs.
The Lord scoffs at them.
Then in anger he rebukes them,
terrifying them with his fierce fury.
For the Lord declares, “I have placed my chosen king on the throne
in Jerusalem, on my holy mountain.”

Psalms 2:7   

The king [David] proclaims the Lord’s decree:
“The Lord said to me, ‘You are my son.
Today I have become your Father.

 

David’s relationship with God continued to grow during the trials and tribulations of his reign.  Some of the psalms are filled with pain and anguish, questions, and even anger, but throughout the prayers and songs, David’s relationship to God is described as that of a son to his father.  The confidence in God’s reach is outlined in Psalm 68:

Psalms 68:5-6         

Father to the fatherless, defender of widows—
this is God, whose dwelling is holy.
God places the lonely in families;
he sets the prisoners free and gives them joy.
But he makes the rebellious live in a sun-scorched land.

 

Psalms 89:26is a psalm written by Ethan, the Ezrahite, explaining the relationship of King David to God and the promises that God had promised to make David and his descendants reign forever.  He writes:

            And he [King David] will call out to me [God], “You are my Father,

My God, and the Rock of my salvation.’

 

The relationship pictured through the words of Psalms is the relationship of a father to a son. David’s theology is clearly based on that premise.

Today is Father’s Day, developed to honor our earthly parent like we honor our mothers in May.  I was surprised to learn that Father’s Day was not made a holiday until 1972 even though Mother’s Day officially became a holiday in 1914. Wikipedia summarizes Father’s Day:

Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. The tradition was said to be started from a memorial service held for a large group of men who died in a mining accident in Monongah, West Virginia in 1909.  It was first proposed by Sonora Dodd of Spokane, Washington in 1909.  It is currently celebrated in the United States annually on the third Sunday in June.  [Accessed on June 14, 2018.]

Understanding the purpose of Father’s Day supports making today a good time to consider who your personal theologian is, especially since so much of the scripture and even church curriculum is based on a father-like relationship with God.

The Church that began developing after Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection grew as disciples began sharing the good news.  These disciples were the first Christian theologians and identified their relationship with God as that of son to a father.

The gospel according to John also continues to develop this idea.  John shares the story of the woman at the well and reports that Jesus said:

John 4:23

“But the time is coming—indeed it’s here now—when true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and in truth.  The Father is looking for those who will worship him that way.”

 

Jesus also talked to the Pharisees about his relationship with God.  They were trying to disprove his authority, but Jesus defined it:

John 5:17-20

17 But Jesus replied, “My Father is always working, and so am I.” 18 So the Jewish leaders tried all the harder to find a way to kill him. For he not only broke the Sabbath, he called God his Father, thereby making himself equal with God.

19 So Jesus explained, “I tell you the truth, the Son can do nothing by himself. He does only what he sees the Father doing. Whatever the Father does, the Son also does. 20 For the Father loves the Son and shows him everything he is doing. In fact, the Father will show him how to do even greater works than healing this man. Then you will truly be astonished. 21 For just as the Father gives life to those he raises from the dead, so the Son gives life to anyone he wants. 22 In addition, the Father judges no one. Instead, he has given the Son absolute authority to judge, 23 so that everyone will honor the Son, just as they honor the Father. Anyone who does not honor the Son is certainly not honoring the Father who sent him.

 

Explaining his relationship to God as that a son to his father should have made the Pharisees clearly understand Jesus’ message, but accepting the truth defies what we as humans understand.  Theologians have and continue to explain the relationship humans have with God.           The Church lives and grows because theologians continue to find ways to share understanding of this relationship.  They are the fathers of our own faith.  The fact that the COR’s stained glass window artist chose just a few shows how God’s story continues despite all the human challenges.

Today’s Catholic church continues to be fathered by the Pope.  Pope Francis demonstrates a more inclusive church today that is adapting to cultural shifts while preserving the New Testament foundation:  Love one another as you want to be loved.

The COR window does include Pope John XXIII (#10 in the window) identified as “. . . one of the most popular popes of all time (reigned 1958–63), who inaugurated a new era in the history of the Roman Catholic Church by his openness to change   [Accessed on June14, 2018 at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Saint-John-XXIII]

The popes are theologians, but The Church did not remain Catholic, and other theologians have lead to major reforms, especially Martin Luther (#26), a practicing priest who became upset about the methods The Church, now known as the Catholic Church/denomination, used to absolve one of their sins.

Luther publically posted on the church door the 95 concerns he had with The Church.  The action is accredited with the establishing of the Protestant branch of The Church.  His actions lead to The Church continuing in different forms of leadership.  Luther was a theologian who saw no separation between God and any individual person, there was no need for a priest to act as a mediator for salvation.

Luther lived in the 1500’s, and John Wesley (#8) was one who continued the reformation process about 200 years later.  We are familiar with his story as Methodists, but do we understand his theological base?  In our denomination, God teaches us to love one another through service. We are one family with God as our father and all others as our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Do you really know your theological father?  Do you know that God is your father?  The centuries that separate us from Jesus’ human experience can separate us from God, too.  This Father’s Day we honor the fathers of our earthly life, but The Church can also use this as an opportunity to remember the theologians of the church.

The Church continues to grow and to reform thanks to the men and women who have sought to understand and to act on that understanding of their relationship with God.  Each of us has a responsibility to do the same, to read scripture, to remain in conversation with other believers, and to live faithfully the best way that we can.

Two other images in the window are known theologians who continue the work of the earliest disciples.  Both are 20thcentury figures that some may not even realize are listed among the theologians who continue to strengthen the work of The Church, regardless of the denomination:  C. S. Lewis (#28) and Dietrich Bonhoeffer (#16).

  1. S. Lewis is an author who wrote the children’s fantasy books in the The Chronicles of Narnia series as well as over 30 other books that share his apologetic theology of God:
  • I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
  • You don’t have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
  • Faith, in the sense in which I am here using the word, is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted, in spite of your changing moods.
  • Aim at heaven and you will get earth thrown in. Aim at earth and you get neither.
  • God cannot give us a happiness and peace apart from Himself, because it is not there. There is no such thing.

 

Admittedly I do not know the actual work of Lewis, but I am eager to learn more.  He tried hard not to be a believer, but life taught him that he has a father-son relationship with God.  His written work reportedly teaches readers of all ages the reality of God, creator, and parent.

Bonhoeffer may be familiar to us, especially in relation to World War II.  His life ended by execution at the hand of the Nazi Regime.  A Lutheran pastor in Germany, he was also a social activist. His theological work was to live one’s Christian faith actively in the secular world.  His political resistance to the Nazi Regime modeled his theology:

  • God’s truth judges created things out of love, and Satan’s truth judges them out of envy and hatred.
  • The test of the morality of a society is what it does for its children.
  • Action springs not from thought, but from a readiness for responsibility.
  • We must learn to regard people less in light of what they do or omit to do, and more in the light of what they suffer.

 

The list of theologians simply includes these individuals mentioned today, but the list continues to grow.  God depends on the father-child relationship we have with him.  The Church is the result of his faithful children working together to continue God’s work.  The Church is a living reflection of God’s children working to strengthen the father-children relationship throughout humanity’s time.

Today, Father’s Day 2018, as God’s children we have a responsibility to know our theological fathers and to remain faithful to our heavenly Father.  The Church grows because the theologians have studied scripture, have led others to know God personally, and have served one another in love in an unending list of ways.

You are asked to know God, just like you want to know your own biological dad.  How do you do it?  You study scripture, you join in Christian conversation, and you live your faith out loud demonstrating the value of God in your life.  You are to model your theology in ways that others may be transformed, too.

Closing prayer:

Happy Fathers Day, God,

We are so blessed by the gift

of life you have given each of us

of your Son, Jesus Christ;

and of your Holy Spirit within us.

Thank you, too, for all those who wrote scriptures,

Who read scripture,

Who took the time to explain your love,

Who risked living their faith out loud.

Guide us in our own work to learn more of your love.

To share your story with those unknown;’

And to serve one another in love, too.

May we be your hands and feet for others

May we know your love within our own hearts.

May we grow The Church as others have.

In the name of you, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost,

Amen, Lord, Amen.

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Luther’s Reformation. Wesley’s Methods. Today’s Revival?

Today is the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.  This is the sermon given on Sunday, October 29, 2017.  

This week, on Halloween, October 31, 2017, there is a Christian milestone to celebrate—the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of 95 theses challenging the problems of the Catholic Church. This is historically identified as the beginning of the Protestant movement.

Trying to summarize the 95 statements is challenging, but primarily Luther had become so incensed to the practices of the Catholic Church, especially paying for one’s penance, that he wrote out the concerns and nailed them to the church door. This one act developed the Protestant church movement that continues today, alongside the Catholic Church.

In Germany, where Martin Luther served as a priest and led the reformation, a unified group of churches under the umbrella of the Evangelical Church of Germany (EKD) published a booklet that outlines the reason and the rational behind the Reformation. The purpose of remembering this event is clearly stated:

Christianity, and indeed human society, always lives from the memories of its history. An honest engagement with the Reformation is always informed and enlightened by historical critique. A genuine understanding of history will presuppose an educational process distinguishing between historical events in the 16th century and what this history means for us today. Such an understanding will avoid any non-historical glorification or naive instrumentalization of those events. (Page 6).

 

The EKD goes on to state the earliest Christians who are now referred to as “Reformers” continued what Luther began:

The Reformers wanted to renew the church of Jesus Christ in the spirit of the gospel, not to divide it. (Page 11).

 

The explanation includes the consequence of the Reformation movement that continues even today, 500 years later:

The Reformers wanted to renew the church of Jesus Christ in the spirit of the gospel, not to divide it. (Page 11).

 

The Reformation as a movement continues yet today. It led to John Wesley and his work, along with so many theologians who are recognized as leaders of various Protestant denominations. The EKD publication states:

This Reformational approach is one in which the search and longing for God, for the holy, for spirituality and inwardness, goes hand in hand with responsibility for our neighbour, the world and the future. (Page 16).

 

As part of the Protestant arm of Christianity, these goals echo the basic premises of the Methodist movement that began with Wesley, who was born in 1706 and began his style of ministry about 30 years later.

Wesley’s movement focused on personal spiritual practices and on social responsibility. He established the small group method that demanded that each person be included in a class that met regularly and required Bible study and accountability. Bishop Rueben Job has simplified Wesley’s expectations to three rules:

  1. Do no harm.
  2. Do good.
  3. Stay in love with God.

The often-repeated quote attributed to Wesley really says it all:


“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

 

The question today, though, takes the Reformation movement and turns it to a personal level: Do you need a revival?

34 But when the Pharisees heard that he had silenced the Sadducees with his reply, they met together to question him again. 35 One of them, an expert in religious law, tried to trap him with this question: 36 “Teacher, which is the most important commandment in the law of Moses?”

37 Jesus replied, “‘You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind.’[a] 38 This is the first and greatest commandment. 39 A second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’[b] 40 The entire law and all the demands of the prophets are based on these two commandments.” (Matthew 22:34-46, NLT)

Again, Do you need a revival? Considering the anniversary of the Reformation and Wesley’s movement about 200 hundred years later, we are reflecting on major shifts in how Christianity is a personal lifestyle, not one dictated by a government or even a particular priest or minister.

Returning to the booklet published by the EKD concerning the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, a series of key points are included under the heading “Reassurance.”

The following seven basic dimensions describe this approach. Although each person will develop it in his or her own way, it reflects the one spirit that God has given us, not a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power and love and self-control«. 2 Tim 1:7 (RSV) (Page 16).

 

The seven dimensions are

  1. Trust in God.
    • A Reformational approach to life knows that faith is a gift. Faith does not live from holding to church doctrines, or observing ritual acts, or following moral precepts.
    • From a Protestant standpoint, faith does not fear rationality.
    • It can therefore ally itself with a worldview shaped by the Enlightenment, the sciences and the humanities.
    • It can therefore ally itself with a worldview shaped by the Enlightenment, the sciences and the humanities. (Page 17).
  2. Being humble.
  • The root of every demeanour and all hopes is the cross. (Page 18).
  • The Cross cuts across established certainties. It makes the soul ready for God’s mercy and, at the same time, humble and willing to defend all those suffering humiliation. (Page 18).
  1. Living our freedom.
  • Reformation piety is not withdrawal from the world, but turning towards it and attending to the needs of our neighbour. . . . – from music to literature, the fine arts, education and research, not to mention the culture of debate in politics and civil society. (Page 19).
  1. Being resistant.
  • a Reformational approach to life stands for a culture of resistance to the abuse of power, fundamentalism and attacks on social minorities. Protestantism participates constructively in societal debates and champions the freedom of individuals to make decisions about their own lives. (Page 21).
  1. Remaining sensitive.
  • Faith lives from our relation to God and becomes practical in love of our neighbour both near and far.
  • . . . basic Reformation insight that education fosters value orientation and personal development. It broadens our horizons, sheds light on other approaches to and ways of life, and makes us sensitive to the cares and sufferings of others. (Page 22).
  1. Finding a home.
  • Faith presses towards community in which there is mutual stimulus and empowerment. (Page 23).
  1. Taking a break.
  • A Reformational approach to life is certain that creation and world history, the present and the future, do not depend alone on what we do, or what we leave undone.
  • . . . puts trust in God and not in the illusion that happiness can be created by human hands.
  • It takes each day as it comes, with its own joys and sorrows. (Page 25).

 

One is free to find a Christian denomination that fits them personally, but the foundation remains in the lessons that Jesus taught as recorded in the New Testament. Reading the lectionary each week does not always provide insight into one’s life for that particular week, but there are gems of messages that can help each one of us live a Christian lifestyle that makes sense in our personal world.

What the EKD does may not be the celebration we plan this week, but the message of how the Reformation transformed The Church 500 years ago, can serve as a self-evaluation for our church today, but more importantly as a self-check for each one of us individually.

Do you need a revival?

Last week’s commentary on the lectionary certainly forced me to consider this question. Reading through the seven points of reassurance, considering Wesley’s methods for Christian living, and then remembering Job’s three simple rules, the need for a revival seems evident.

Today’s Methodist church is facing the need for a revival and that means each one of us needs to consider the need for a personal revival. Attending the New Wineskins conference a couple of weeks ago, I was surprised to learn that many growing congregations that have either been a restart or a new plant are not using any reference to the denomination in its formal name. One speaker noted that it seemed to help not using the term ‘Methodist’ and yet another one said that using the identifying term did not seem to have a negative effect.

Today, our denomination is being challenged to live its very fundamental life style as visibly as any organization. The use of social media, advertising, high-quality graphics and signage all place our Christian values in full public display. If we as Methodists, as a Methodist congregation, do not reflect the image of Christ, then we are in need of a revival.

Paul was clearly supporting the new congregations struggling to live a Christian lifestyle while living in communities that were filled with pagan practices. Christianity was a reformation movement from the beginning and has always adapted to cultural changes one way or another. The Protestant movement that spun out of Martin Luther’s actions as he hung up the 95 Thesis on the door of the church in defiance of the Pope has carried God’s message throughout the world and forward through the centuries.

We must honestly address the question of whether or not we need a revival, and then we must move forward to make sure that we are living out Jesus’ message of loving God and loving one another. Imagine how maintaining those two commandments can transform our world, but most importantly how it can transform our own lives.

The final page of the EKD’s booklet simply states:

A Reformational approach to life – nurtured by historical commemoration, trusting in God, rooted in Scripture, bearing responsibility in the present – is a wellspring of humanity for every society.

 

After all, a wisdom refined by spirituality teaches us to live sober, upright, and godly lives in this world. Tit 2:12 (RSV) (Page 36).

 

The verse from Titus 2 is part of Paul’s words of instruction to Titus as he is left to serve the church in Crete. The context includes more advice that we need to consider when wondering if we are in need of a revival:

11 For the grace of God has been revealed, bringing salvation to all people.12 And we are instructed to turn from godless living and sinful pleasures. We should live in this evil world with wisdom, righteousness, and devotion to God ,13 while we look forward with hope to that wonderful day when the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ, will be revealed. 14 He gave his life to free us from every kind of sin, to cleanse us, and to make us his very own people, totally committed to doing good deeds. (Titus 2:11-14, NLT)

As a closing prayer for this anniversary, I used the following from http://revgalblogpals.blogspot.com/2011/10/prayer-for-reformation-sunday.html

Here we stand, Lord,
The people you have redeemed.
Here we stand, Lord,
giving thanks to you for you are good.
We give thanks that your love lasts forever.
We thank you that you free those who are oppressed.

Here we stand knowing that it is you
We all can cry out to for help in times of trouble.
We know that you will not only deliver us but
That you will lead our way to where we need to go.

Here we stand by the living water
That you set flowing for all.
We drink freely from your waters
That gratifies everyone who is thirsty.
And we thank you that you also
Give plenty to eat for those who are hungry.

Here we stand with those who reformed the church so long ago
And with those who still are reforming the church today.
Here we stand witnesses to your good news for all.
Here we stand your servants, your followers, your children.

–by Abigail Carlisle-Wilke

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God’s Gifts: Baby Jesus

given on Sunday, December 29, after an ice storm canceled the Dec. 22 service 

            Journaling is a dying art, yet it is so important for sociologists in their studies of humanity.  It is also key to historians as they search for secrets of what happened in different time periods.  For families, discovering a journal from a previous generation is a rare and priceless gift.

Opening up the gospel of Luke, his own words show that this book is much like a journal incorporating his personal experience and study of Jesus’ ministry.  The audience is clearly defined as Theophilus, a personal friend whom he is trying to share the story in an honest, logical manner.

Imagine how his family, his grandchildren, and even generations later must have felt that their patriarch knew Jesus, had walked the paths where Jesus walked.  And imagine how we, over 2,000 years later, feel if Luke had not written his thoughts about Jesus.  Does this journal provide the foundation for lasting faith?

Personally, much of my understanding of who I am is based on the words of people who reported what their lives were.  Reading journals, biographies and autobiographies, paints a picture of the generations that preceded me.  I am a product of generations and reading their words shapes who I am.

Luke was educated, he had opportunities that others might never have had, still he had a story to tell.  The words we read today are the words translated generation after generation as his story continues to reach out to others like Theophilus.  The question we must each ask ourselves is whether or not we have shared the first Christmas story with our family and friends.

Luke said it so clearly:

1 Many people have attempted to write about the things that have taken place among us.  . . .  I myself have carefully looked into everything from the beginning. So it seemed good also to me to write down an orderly report of exactly what happened. I am doing this for you, most excellent Theophilus. I want you to know that the things you have been taught are true.

Are we able to say we have done the same thing?  Have we felt driven to provide those in our lives The Story?

Over the past 25 years, I have struggled to continue the faith story of my parents.  I never questioned our weekly schedule of church on Sunday, choir on Wednesday, or even the daily grace given at the table every time we sat down as a family meal whether breakfast, lunch or supper.  My parents simply placed God in our lives almost like He was a physical family member.

Luke writes The Story in a manner that reaches out to me.  He makes the story come alive and his arguments convinces readers of the reality of Jesus, of the lessons Jesus taught, and the historical record of this man’s life—born, lived, and destroyed—alongside the Israelites and the Gentiles, not to mention world citizens traveling and moving around a vital economic center during that time period.

Who has written The Story since Luke’s gospel?  Are there journals to read since that time that continues teaching the generations about Jesus, about the New Covenant God made through the life of Jesus?  Can we continue to see the effect of The Story has made on humanity?

The research continues, but the answer is yes.  Sometimes the horror created by un-Christian decisions crowds out the story of God’s love, but even when humanity is at it worst, God’s love remains.  The only way is to study, to seek out the Christian story and learn how it continues to sustain humanity.

Luke’s story shares an eloquent narrative of the Messiah’s birth.  It is artfully written, has been translated and preserved as closely as possible to its original language.  And even the most gifted historians, linguists, sociologists, anthropologists, and authors continue to weave The Story through the generations, the centuries, or even the millenniums.

Today we have a responsibility—to continue telling the story.  Not only do we have to live our faith privately and publically, we have to tell the story.

Telling the story does not have to be difficult, but we need to step it up.  The results are worth it.

First, live your faith openly.  I was shocked this month to hear myself wishing family, friends, and even store clerks and others a “happy holiday.”  I realized that for over 30 years, I had trained myself to say “Happy Holiday” rather than “Merry Christmas.”

Why?  I actually had to face the fact that as a teacher, I had lost Christmas because I was told to be politically correct.  Once I realized it, I had to consciously work on changing it.  I would off-handedly respond “Happy Holiday” and then as I said it, stumbled and shifted to “Merry Christmas.”

Secondly, establish a weekly routine that places God first.  Think about scheduling church attendance, Bible study, or additional faith appointments before other time commitments.  Our culture is reflecting the lack of prioritizing faith by the scheduling of sporting events before church events.  No longer do school systems or other family events schedule around church.  Now church is scheduled around personal time choices.  We do not stand up and refuse to participate just because something is scheduled at a faith related commitment.

Thirdly, on a daily basis, do we live our faith 24 hours seven days a week?  Do we wake up and hear the verse echoing in our minds:  “Today is the day that the Lord has made, be glad and rejoice in it!”  Do we offer a table grace when we sit down to a meal—or do we skip the table and go straight to the couch potato position with the television blaring?  Do we close our day with an evening prayer asking forgiveness, for healing, for supplication or just thanks for the day.

And finally, consider Luke’s method—he used written word to continue telling the story.  We can do the same thing, even if it is a simple entry into a personal journal that can be read and shared and read again.  Maybe it does not seem important, but it is.  Who knows who might find that journal and read a life-changing message from it.

And this is a task I need to train myself to do.  I used to journal, I encouraged my mother to journal, now I have an aunt who has used a journal/planner, and now I work to have others begin a journal too.  This is a simply way to account how faith works in your life.

Journaling may not be something you are comfortable doing, but stop and consider how you can preserve and share how faith works in your life.  Maybe it is a record of blessings, maybe the calendar can hold key words to trigger memories.  Maybe it is the camera whether on the phone you carry or the tablet you use, or the photos you place in a scrapbook or album.

Luke wrote his faith in two books, the Gospel of Luke and Acts.  Through the ages, others have written their faith, too.  John Wesley, Martin Luther, Charles Wesley—in his hymns, Dr. Albert Schweitzer, Corrie ten Baum, Anne Frank, Billy Graham, Max Lucado, Adam Hamilton, Bishop Schnase, and more.  We might not be gifted authors, but we have a story to tell.  Who knows when the next generation will find the record of faith we each have to share.  Our faith is our life, and it is our responsibility to live it and to share it.  It is our gift to the future to share the story of God’s gift, the baby Jesus.

Closing prayer:

Dear God,

Thank you for Luke, for all the gospels, for the Bible

that tells the story of your gifts from creation to the birth of a baby.

Thank you for all those disciples who carried the story into action

modeling lives that were filled with love and compassion.

Thank you for all those early followers who carried the Story

into new generations, into new lands, and into the future.

Lead us to reading the Story over and over again

so our generations learn to love one another.

Lead us to tell the Story to our families, to our friends, and to others

in order to learn the way to live our faith openly.

Lead us to preserve the Story as our generations pass it on

to the generations ahead keeping faith alive.  –Amen.

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